Posts Tagged ‘lighting’

Spraypainted Navy Lamps

This week has been kind of exciting. Lots of thinking, researching, and discussing my professional future. Nothing has been decided for sure yet, but I’m starting to be ready for a new challenge and I’m getting pretty excited thinking about it.

Anyway, there was a little more progress on the bedroom makeover.

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I DIY-ed a couple of glossy navy blue lamps to bring a little more navy to this space. As you may recall, it looked like this after I added some Greek Key trim to the curtains:

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The current bedside lamps were a little small in scale and were getting a bit lost next to our king-size bed and generously-sized nightstands.

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So I decided to make over a couple of trophy lamps that I had picked up from the Habitat Restore a while back. They were $5 each, new, and I’m pretty sure they were overstocked from Walmart.

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There was nothing wrong with the oil-rubbed bronze finish but I wanted something less traditional and more fun in our bedroom.

I taped off the light sockets and cords and gave the lamps several light coats of navy blue spray paint.

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Then I let the lamps cure in the garage for 2 weeks to ensure that the major part of the off-gassing occurred before we brought the lamps into our room.

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I am really really happy with how they turned out. I think this is one of my favorite spray paint projects to date. It helps that I’m getting better at spraying lightly and evenly and I’ve learned not to spray paint on a windy day =).

The glossy navy finish actually makes these cheap lamps look way more expensive.

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The lampshades are just $10 shades from IKEA but I’m thinking of adding some ribbon trim to the edges.

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The new lamps are more appropriate in scale to the room (please ignore the crooked duvet!).

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before after lamp

From run-of-the-mill to glossy and glam =). What do you think?

Sharing at Tinysidekick, TheBlissfulBee!

DIY Steel Pipe Light Fixture

My husband is amazing.

I know, gag. Get a room, people! But seriously. He is amazing. Not only because he is an extremely good husband but also because he is an incredibly talented DIY-er, designer, all-round handyman… He is very creative and he has the spatial reckoning skills to really do something with his creativity.

I already showed you the wine rack he built me for Christmas, and this was kind of a bonus New Year’s gift that was installed just in time for our New Year’s Day party.

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Boom! This amazingly awesome industrial DIY chandelier that he made out of steel pipe and fittings.

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Behold the beauty, my friends.

Well, to take a little credit for myself (hehe), we worked on the design of this light fixture together. Chris came up with the long H-shaped concept, which we thought would work well with the length of our dining room table (also a DIY, by the way). I weighed in on the design by making each section a slightly random length to keep it asymmetrical and more modern-looking. But really, Chris was the mastermind here.

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Once the design was hammered out, Chris ordered the fixture parts online (from Zorotools.com, but they’re available at Home Depot too if you want to look at them in person) and simply screwed them all together once they arrived. The assembly literally took less than an hour.

Here’s a diagram if you’re interested in re-creating this chandelier:

diy chandelier diagram

A) Nipple,1 1/2 x 2 In 1
B) Floor Flange,1-1/2 In 1
C) Reducer,1-1/2 x 1/2 In 7
D) Tee,1/2 In 9
E) Square Head Plug,1/2 In 4
F) Nipple,1/2 x 7 In 4
G) Nipple,1/2 x 6 In 2
H) Nipple,1/2 x 3 In 2
I) Nipple,1/2 x 1 1/2 In 6
J) Pipe,1/2 x 24 In 1

 

Of course, wiring the fixture, the switch, and the fixture box in the ceiling took a little longer. I’m not going to tell you how to do that. I don’t want to be responsible for anyone accidentally shocking or electrocuting themselves. So, hire an electrician, or if you want to DIY you will find tons of tutorials online on how to wire a light fixture.

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Me likey.

Chris spray painted the porcelain bulb sockets black before wiring them. We sprayed the whole thing with clear lacquer to protect the exposed steel (after wiping off the protective oil with some mineral spirits). Right now the light sockets are just sitting inside the fittings. We’re not sure how to attach them yet but we’re thinking silicone caulk might do the trick.

UPDATE: An awesome reader who happens to be a house inspector recommended using 2-part epoxy to glue the sockets onto the frame. Here’s what he said:

I would recommend using 2 part epoxy. It actually will set better with heat and bonds almost anything and can handle heat without deterioration.

Thanks, Bob!

The cost for the pipe/fittings was about $38. The ceramic light sockets were free, since we re-used ones from an old ceiling fan that came with the house, but there are similar ones available at Home Depot for around $3 each. The lamp wire is sold by the foot at Home Depot at about $0.40 a foot so about $8 total. The spray paint and spray lacquer cost about $6 total. So for about $70 (actually less for us since we already had the sockets) we have a unique chandelier that costs less than half the price of comparable light fixtures.

Note: We used these budget-friendly lightbulbs. They are incandescent but we figured that since we will only be using this chandelier for meals in the dining room, we didn’t need to splurge on dimmable LEDs.

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Here’s a wide shot of our dining/living room. There’s the DIY dining room table Chris built (yes, I know many of you having been clamoring for a tutorial on that…it will come…someday). There are the Goodwill chairs we reupholstered and that we are planning to refinish soon. There’s the Craigslist sofa and the L-shaped sofa table we built behind it. Far in the left corner there’s the green dresser I painted.

Oh and not to mention the sliding glass door we installed (yes, cut a hole in the wall and everything). This room is truly a testament to DIY.

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DIY pipe chandelier

Sharing at SavvySouthernStyleTheBlissfulBee, Remodelaholic, TatertotsandJello and DIYShowoff!

(Under $100) Flush Mount Lights That Aren’t Ugly

The ceilings in our 70’s-era tract home are just under 8 feet. So one of the challenges we’ve discovered in renovating is that we have had to replace a lot of flush-mount ceiling light fixtures. Specifically, a lot of brass ‘boob’ lamps. Kinda like these, but imagine them in shiny 90’s brass:

boob lamps

Why is it so hard to find flush mount ceiling lights that aren’t ugly???

In my search for flush mount lighting I’ve been dismayed at the lack of cute flush mount fixtures out there. Almost everything is a boob or a version of a boob, and most of them look dated and/or boring. That, or they cost several hundred dollars. Hmm…under $100 is more my cup of tea. So I thought I’d bring together some of the fixtures I’ve been considering in case any of you are looking for cute flush mounts on a budget too.

So here we go — stylish flush mount ceiling fixtures under $100!

flush mount light fixtures collage

1. World Imports Schoolhouse Semi-Flush Fixture (Amazon,$49.06): Schoolhouse style lights are classic and are really trendy right now, and luckily they’re not expensive. This one is available from Amazon but I’ve seen it at Home Depot too. It would look totally cute with a couple stripes painted on (perhaps with nail polish, a la Little Green Notebook).

2. Hampton Bay Edgemoor Semi-Flush Mount (Home Depot, $89.97): This may be technically a semi-flush mount but it seems pretty close to flush, so this might work in a space where you’re tight on clearance. I’ve seen this at Home Depot in person, and the black finish looks a little cheap, but I think the Moroccan trellis shade would look awesome if you could spray paint it a warm antique brass.

3. Hampton Bay Oxnard Nickel Flush Mount (Home Depot, $44.97): I love how this light can look clean and modern in the original brushed nickel finish, but imagine it spray painted a vintagey brass (I know, I have a problem) or even oil-rubbed bronze? Suddenly it would look totally vintage steam-punk. Check out how The Hunted Interior transformed hers.

4. Vanadin Flush Mount (IKEA, $39.99): I was so excited when I saw this new fixture at IKEA, and at such a great price too! I picked one up for our front entry. It has a great vintage-modern look with its white glass shade — almost like vintage milk glass reinterpreted into a lamp. It’s a little blah with the white base but I plan on painting that…you guessed it — vintage brass.

5. allen + roth Castine Outdoor Flush Mount (Lowe’s, $79.98): Who says you can only use exterior lights indoors? For some reason outdoor flush mounts have more variety — you’re not just stuck with endless variations on the boob lamp. Plus, the more industrial look is in now. I love the seeded glass and oil-rubbed bronze finish on this one.

6. Simple Classic Pendant (West Elm, $69): I think these simple white round lights would look awesome in a midcentury modern-style home, especially in a series. They totally have a Saarinen tulip table vibe.

So if you’ve been discouraged because you’ve been looking for a flush mount fixture for your low ceiling, there are some stylish options out there! Don’t settle; go out and get yourself one!

Quick Front Door Light Revamp

Our front door is still a work in progress.  Actually, it’s more like a construction zone right now with paint splatters, dozens of cardboard boxes, landscaping materials, tools, and a broken pool pump lying on the patio by the front entrance.  But still, we wanted to do something about this lamp.

Before:

Not the prettiest lamp, you see.  Not only was it old and cruddy and covered in paint, but it’s also builder’s standard brass, which we weren’t huge fans of.  We were so eager to change it we didn’t even take a before pic of it on the wall.

We headed to the Habitat Restore and scored a cute copper-toned number for just $20.  It was a floor model from Home Depot (or some other type hardware store).  We know because it still had the display bracket attached to it.  Although it’s a discontinued model, we estimate that it probably cost at least $50 originally, so we feel pretty good about our find.

Why helloooo beautiful…

Much better.

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