Category: DIY

DIY Console Table Plans

This L-shaped DIY sofa console that we have in our living room is definitely our most popular project to date.

Reclaimed Wood Console Table

Because a couple of people have commented or emailed to let me know that they are attempting (or have attempted) to build this console table, we decided to draw up some loose plans to give our readers a better idea of how the table is put together.

We made an L-shaped console table, but it was basically just two straight tables butted up perpendicular to each other. I haven’t listed specific measurements here, because you can adjust the length of the console table to fit your space.

This is how each piece of the table will look.

Sofa Table5 (1)

Sofa Table

Sofa Table 02

Sofa Table 03

We didn’t bother to hide the screws, so everything is attached together using screws drilled through from the outside surface.

Sofa Table4

Sofa Table 06

Sofa Table8

Sofa Table7

Sofa Table9

We’re not professionals in drawing up plans (especially not me), but we hope that additional angles and information will help those of you who are building a similar table.

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For more photos of the finished project, please go to the original post for the DIY Sofa Table. Have fun!

Painted Emerald Living Room Dresser

green painted dresser close

There’s a pretty green lady peeking out of the corner of the living room.

green painted dresser

This emerald beauty started out not-so-pretty. But like a true Cinderella story, her years of hard work paid off and she was rewarded with a breathtaking makeover and a home with people who love her.

She started off like this:

painted dresser before

 

old dresser before

Just a nondescript, cream-colored dresser like many you see at garage sales and thrift stores. I thought the plank sides and farmhouse-y top were kind of unique though, so I decided I had nothing to lose by painting her.

After we filled the holes and gave her a light sanding, I had to decide on paint. I’ve been wanting to paint something green for AGES, so I chose Behr Paint and Primer in Pine Grove, a deep emerald/Kelly green. I applied it with a synthetic brush and a small foam roller. It took me three coats to get the coverage I wanted (pretty typical with highly pigmented latex paints). I then protected the paint with a couple coats of Polycrylic.

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I chose brass pulls by Martha Stewart from HomeDepot.com. They are actually less shiny than they look online. I love them, and they are only $1.98 each! Super affordable.

Halfway through adding the hardware I decided the paint finish was a little too flat and one-dimensional. It needed more interest, more depth. I decided to add a glaze. Because I didn’t want to deal with smelly oil-based or wax glazes, I chose this craft antiquing glaze that is water-based and easy to clean up (Martha Stewart tintable glaze from Michaels). I mixed it with raw umber and burnt umber craft paints until it looked like a thick, rich, hot chocolate.

martha stewart glaze

 

glazing dresser

I applied the glaze with a foam brush and then left it to set for about 10 minutes. When it was tacky, I buffed it off.

buffing glaze

I didn’t want my little dresser to look too “faux”, so I kept it light on the glaze, buffing most of it off. I just wanted to add a little dimension and depth to the paint color. As with makeup, a little bit goes a long way =). Here it is again, finished. I’ll probably want to add another layer of Polycrylic at some point to protect the glazed finish…when I get around to it…

green painted dresser

I think the glaze gives it a lot more character. And we all know how important character is in every Cinderella story.

dresser before and after

dresser corner

We wanted a more substantial piece of furniture to fill up that corner (we had a small round side table there before). And since it’s so close to the front door, it’s also a great place to store pool/swimming gear (goggles, floaties, sunscreen), extra flip-flops, umbrellas, etc…

It’s a little high to set a drink on but because we have the DIY sofa console table behind the sofa for drinks, it’s not a problem.

The dresser was free (a hand-me-down), so this makeover only cost us $10 for paint, and $18 for hardware, bringing the total to about $28!

green painted dresser close

I’m starting to get addicted to painting furniture. I might try chalk paint or milk paint next to get good adhesion without peeling. I have a few more pieces to paint so stay tuned! In the meantime, what do you think of this deep, rich green? Is it a color you would use in your home?

Sharing at BetweenNapsOnThePorch, DIYShowOff, NotJustaHousewife, HopeStudios, AStrollThruLife, SavvySouthernStyle, DomesticallySpeaking, TheShabbyCreekCottage, MissMustardSeed, Remodelaholic, Startathome

Reupholstered Dining Chairs

Remember these beauties we found at a local Goodwill?

dining chairs side

I was planning to strip down the wood and refinish them, and then reupholster the seats, but realistically I realized refinishing the wood wasn’t going to happen for a long, long, time. So no need to hold off on reupholstering!

dining chair before

The wood isn’t actually that bad. It’s just a very yellowy-orangey honey oak, which I don’t mind that much, except that our floors are also honey oak, as are our coffee tables in the family and the dining set in the breakfast nook. Oh, the 70’s and its love of honey oak!

upholstering dining chairs

I found a beautiful DwellStudio home decor fabric at a Home Fabrics outlet. They have such awesome prices! I’ll always be checking there for fabrics from now on. They have a huge selection of discounted fabrics. This one was $8.99 a yard (normally it retails for over $20)! I was able to upholster two seats over the 54″ fabric width, so really I just needed 1.5 yards for the whole project (though I bought 2 yards just in case). We laid out and centered our fabric, then cut it with plenty of extra room on the sides.

upholstering chairs

Then we basically followed the same idea as when we stretched an oil painting…same principle — gently pull fabric and staple-gun in the middle of each side, then work out towards the corners.

upholstering chair corners

We made 2 unobtrusive folds at the corners so they would lay flat.

Et voila!

upholstered chair

I really love the fabric. It is retro and modern at the same time and goes so well with the style (and color) of the chairs! It is about a zillion times better than the old burgundy fabric!

before and after chair

It will do for a while until I get around to refinishing the chairs. I love projects like these…easy, quick, almost instant gratification =).

Did I mention they’re super comfy to sit on too?

Sharing at TheShabbyCreekCottage, MissMustardSeed, ShabbyNest, NotJustaHousewife and Remodelaholic!

What’s Up This Week

This week we were working on a bunch of projects but didn’t get a chance to finish anything, so I’ll post finished pics next week. I was also struggling with fatigue from 3 nights of insomnia (gah!). But I’ll share a few updates on our progress this week.

diy table

Our DIY dining table is almost done! It’s been basically constructed and now needs to be finished off with stain and poly, and then assembled in the dining room.

baby using tools

This little girl helped put the table together.

staining table

Yesterday we put on a couple coats of stain (Minwax Special Walnut, my favorite) and we’re going to put on a couple coats of polyurethane today.

dining chairs goodwill

I often feel like we never find anything good at Goodwill anymore, but then something like this happens! My latest find — four mid-century-esque dining chairs. Solid oak, cushion stuffing in really good condition. Oh and did I mention the table came with (I’m saving it for the “craft room” in the loft when we get around to it). All for 40 bones?! I have a feeling these chairs are more 80’s than truly mid-century but I think they’ll be great once I recover the seats and refinish the wood (hopefully in a less honey finish, if I can sand off all of the current finish).

And finally:

trader joes cards

I switched in some new “art” in the small 5×7 frames on the left of this gallery wall in the breakfast nook. They are actually cards from Trader Joe’s for 99 cents each!

(Please ignore the disintegrating trim on the right there. It will all be fixed. Someday. Also, paint on the walls. It will happen, I promise.)

trader joes art

Trader Joe’s has the cutest cards, and they are printed on really nice textured matte cardstock that looks just like watercolor paper. I love that they have a lot of non-subject specific cards so they don’t look strange framed. Go get some! For a buck you can get really cute art at Trader Joe’s to switch things up around the house!

Elsewhere on the Internet, a few more of my articles are up at Wisebread.com:

Is Your Apple Dangerous? How to Eat Fewer Pesticides (While Saving Money) – buying organic is one way, but there are several strategies you can use to reduce your pesticide exposure in food.

5 Ways to Say “No” to Friends and Family – We all could use some more balance in our lives…saying “no” once in a while is a good start.

How to Save 10-20% on Online Purchases Every Day – My not-so-secret method for saving every time you buy something online.

Have a great weekend everyone!

Our Big Weekend Project

I still can’t believe we managed to pull this off in a weekend.

Granted, it was a long weekend, but this project was completed in just two days. So definitely weekend doable.

This is our living room wall before.

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And this is our living room wall now.

slider complete

That’s right. We cut a hole in the wall and installed a sliding glass door into this long and windowless wall in our living room!

By “we”, really, I mean Chris and his dad installed the slider. I contributed by being in charge of the toddler all day and by giving constructive criticism when warranted ;).

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Our walls are ridiculously thin. These mass-manufactured tract homes were built out of prefab wall panels and our walls are only about 2″ thick.

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Chris peeled off the outer layer (after removing the electrical) so he could see what he was dealing with. Then he cut a hole just so he could step through and work.

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You can really see how thin our walls are. Basically two plywood panels joined with pieces of wood and this interesting honeycomb foam insulation, which was disintegrating from age. Also, there were large gaps where there was no insulation.

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Chris and his dad cut the hole to the size of the slider (which we bought from Lowe’s for about $350).

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After cutting the hole they added a new header and side support beams. You can see the header above, whereas the side support beams were inserted into the walls between the plywood panels.

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Because we are planning to install rigid foam insulation and siding over the walls this summer, we wrapped the window frame and surrounding walls with Tyvek, a water resistant barrier. Then Chris added flashing to the sides.

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You gotta flash the windows properly to prevent leaks. Other windows in our house had not been flashed properly and in a driving rain, water leaks through. We can kind of get away with it in Southern California, but still, better to do it right. We’re hoping to flash the rest of the windows properly before we install new siding.

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We were chasing the light, but we got ‘er done! All this in one day!

slider horiz

The next day we added the pieces of trim, partially salvaged from the board and batten (well really just the battens) we had removed with the wall.

Because our walls are so thin, the window frame was thicker than the wall. Fortunately, the board and batten thickened the wall so it came up flush against the frame, and then the extra trim we added along the top and sides finished it off. We just need to caulk the seams, patch nail holes, and add another coat of paint.

Not bad for a couple days’ work, eh?

Sharing at HopeStudios, AStrollThruLife and SavvySouthernStyle!

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